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Agricultural Experimental Stations and their publications: Kentucky

Grasslands

Station History

 University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment logoThe Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky (later the University of Kentucky) found its permanent home in Lexington in 1865, after Kentucky University Regent John Bryan Bowman purchased Henry Clay's Ashland and J.B. Tilford's Woodlands estates. It was not until 1881 that William Ashbrook Kellerman was hired as the first full-time professor of agriculture after the Kentucky General Assembly authorized a half-cent property tax to support the establishment of an Agricultural Department.

The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment was founded as, and remains a land-grant institution, committed to improving the quality of life for Kentuckians. Our research, teaching, and extension programs are part of a national system that maintains a statewide presence and links local, state, and global issues. Agriculture, food, and environmental systems are key components of Kentucky's economic future, and the college is playing a prominent role in those areas with its programs.

University Repository

Extension Publications

Progress report

no online access


Bulletin

Lexington, Ky. : Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, 1885-

Online access (scattered previous isses) and no.64(1896)-no.251(1924)


Circular

Lexington : The Station, 1885-1952.

Online access to no.1(1885)-no.38(1927)


Contact Information

Nancy Cox, Ph.D.
S123 Ag Science North
Lexington, KY 40546-0091
859-257-4772

Historic Photographs

Kentucky Agricultural Station

The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky (later the University of Kentucky) date unknown.

 

A popular engraving widely circulated during Clay's lifetime depicted "The Sage of Ashland" seated in a chair on his front lawn, the mansions' facade behind him. The estate was purchased and became the permanent home of the University of Kentucky.

A popular engraving widely circulated during Clay's lifetime depicted "The Sage of Ashland" seated in a chair on his front lawn, the mansions' facade behind him. The estate was purchased and became the permanent home of the University of Kentucky.