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LuEsther T. Mertz Library
Plant & Research Guides

Agricultural Experimental Stations and their publications: Utah

field of grass

Station History

Utah Agricultural Experiment Station logoThough more than 100 years old, Extension is as vital as ever, and perhaps even more so, due to the increased diversity and complexity of the issues people encounter today. The Extension system continues its longstanding tradition of extending the university to the people to improve the quality of life for individuals, families, and communities. Extension is unique in structure and function. As a partnership of federal, state, and local governments, the Extension system--with its network of county offices and state universities, is in a position to deliver educational programs at the grassroots level throughout the nation. With its university faculty and staff serving the states and territories most located in the over 3,000 counties across the country, the county Extension office is truly the front door to America's land-grant universities. This integration of teaching, research, and public service enables the Extension system to respond to critical and emerging issues with research-based, unbiased information

Extension Publications

Circular no.1(1904)-no.97(1932)

Bulletin no.24(1893)-no.381(1956)

are both found in the DigitalCommons@USU


Contact Information

Utah State University
Utah Agricultural Experiment Station
Agricultural Science Building, 4th Floor
4810 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-4810
Phone: (435) 797-2200
Fax: (435) 797-3321

Historic Photographs

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f6/The_Utah_Farmer_-_Devoted_to_Agriculture_in_the_Rocky_Mountain_Region_%281915%29_%2814598152840%29.jpg/256px-The_Utah_Farmer_-_Devoted_to_Agriculture_in_the_Rocky_Mountain_Region_%281915%29_%2814598152840%29.jpg

Devil's Gateway
The Utah Farmer, 1918
Courtesy of Wikimedia

Utah Agricultural Experiment Station

Chemical Building used by Utah Agriculture and Station.  A stand of Carolina poplars planted for fuel. Imaegs courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.