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LuEsther T. Mertz Library
Plant & Research Guides

Wisconsin Native Plant Societies: Home

Botanical Club of Wisconsin Logo

The Botanical Club of Wisconsin promotes the preservation of the flora and habitats of the Wisconsin area. Through education, the funding of research, and offering a place to share enthusiasm for the local native flora, the Botanical Club offers opportunities for involvement. See their website for further information.

 

North Woods Native Plant Society

According to their website the North Woods Native Plant Society is interested in understanding and preserving the native plants and habitats of northern Wisconsin and the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Join their free botanist led field trips which are open to anyone who “wants to learn more about our native ecosystems and pledges not to destroy, remove, or disturb them

 

The Prairie Enthusiasts Logo

The Prairie Enthusiasts' mission is to protect land with remnant prairies and savannahs in the Upper Midwest. They accomplish this in many ways. They practice land management with volunteer work parties. Educate whenever they can by offering brochures, school presentations, educational hikes, special programs, and materials and staff for conferences. They also strive to own areas that need protection.They have 11 chapters located in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Illinois.

Society Newsletters

The Flora Newsletter is available to anyone visiting the Botanical Club’s website.

The Prairie Promoter is a quarterly newsletter available on their website.

The Wood Violet

The wood violet, Viola sororia
Courtesy Wikimedia Commons/James Steakley.

The wood violet, Viola sororia, is the state flower of Wisconsin. It is one of the earliest signs of spring.

Recommended Reading

Increase Lapham

Increase Lapham

Increase Lapham, 1811-1875, mastered many disciplines and is highly regarded as Wisconsin’s first scientist. He identified and preserved thousands of botanical specimens. He surveyed and mapped Wisconsin's effigy mounds. He was a force behind the creation of the National Weather Service, lobbying for a storm warning system to protect Great Lakes sailors. Several landmarks and monuments honoring Lapham can be found throughout the state.